June 10, 2009

Confirmed cases of A(H1N1) SWINE FLU in the Philippines

The Philippines now has the highest number of confirmed cases of Influenza A (H1N1) in Southeast Asia, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

As of June 9, 2009, there are 54 confirmed cases of A(H1N1) or Swine Flu in the country.

All cases showed only mild symptoms of the disease and no deaths have been reported so far.

More details about the Swine Flu A(H1N1) symptoms, prevention, and treatment here.

List of all confirmed Swine Flu cases in the Philippines below.

Confirmed Cases of Swine Flu A(H1N1) in the Philippines
  1. Girl, 10 years old, Filipino, who traveled with family in the US and Canada (reported May 21)
  2. Woman, 50 years old, Filipino, arrived from Chicago in the US (May 25)
  3. Girl, 1 year old, Filipino, came from the US (May 27)
  4. Boy, 13 years old, Filipino, visited Hong Kong (May 27)
  5. Man, 55 years old, Filipino, no history of travel but attended a wedding in Zambales and came into contact with two Taiwanese guests confirmed to have swine flu after returning to Taiwan (May 27)
  6. Woman, 26 years old, Filipino, also present at the wedding (May 27)
  7. Woman, 24 years old, Filipino, also attended the wedding (May 28)
  8. Girl, 1 year old, Filipino, daughter of Case #7 (May 28)
  9. Man, 47 years old, Filipino, also present at the wedding (May 28)
  10. Boy, 13 years old, Foreigner, also attended the wedding (May 28)
  11. Woman, 42 years old, Filipino, also present at the wedding (May 30)
  12. Man, 20 years old, Filipino, also attended the wedding (May 30)
  13. Girl, 7 years old, Filipino, who returned from the US (May 30)
  14. Woman, 19 years old, Filipino, who also came from the US (May 30)
  15. Man, 51 years old, Filipino, arrived from the US (May 30)
  16. Man, 21 years old, Filipino, son of Case #15 who came from the US with his father (May 30)
  17. Woman, 40 years old, Filipino, present at the Zambales wedding (June 1)
  18. Man, 51 years old, Filipino, also present at the Zambales wedding (June 1)
  19. Man, 19 years old, Filipino, arrived from the US (June 1)
  20. Man, 45 years old, Filipino, came from the US (June 1)
  21. Woman, 39 years old, Filipino, common-law-wife of Case #20, also came from the US (June 1)
  22. Woman, 21 years old, Japanese, foreign exchange student at De La Salle University (DLSU) Taft, Manila (June 3)
  23. Man, 20 years old, Japanese, graduate student at DLSU, classmate and dorm-mate of Case #22 (June 4)
  24. Woman, 52 years old, Filipino, employee of Asian Development Bank (ADB) who returned from the US (June 4)
  25. Girl, 12 years old, Filipino, arrived from the US together with Cases #26 and #27 (June 4)
  26. Girl, 16 years old, Filipino, arrived from the US together with Cases #25 and #27 (June 4)
  27. Man, 18 years old, Filipino, arrived from the US together with Cases #25 and #26 (June 4)
  28. Man, 22 years old, Filipino, came from the US (June 4)
  29. Woman, 33 years old, Filipino, pregnant woman who came from the US (June 4)
  30. Man, 17 years old, Filipino, third case in DLSU, did not travel outside the Philippines and could not recall if he had contact with the two (2) confirmed DLSU cases (June 5)
  31. Woman, 29 years old, American citizen, came from the US (June 5)
  32. Girl, 7 years old, Filipino, arrived from the US (June 5)
  33. Girl, 9 years old, Filipino, sister of Case #32 who also came from the US (June 5)
  34. Man, 20 years old, Japanese, fourth confirmed DLSU case, no history of travel to swine flu-infected countries, like Cases #35, #36, and #37 (June 8)
  35. Man, 20 years old, Korean, fifth student of DLSU infected by the virus (June 8)
  36. Man, 16 years old, Filipino, also a student of DLSU, sixth case (June 8)
  37. Man, 22 years old, American, DLSU student, seventh confirmed case (June 8)
  38. Woman, 18 years old, Filipino, student of East Asia College of Far Eastern University in Manila, also with no history of travel to infected countries (June 8)
  39. Woman, 22 years old, Filipino, traveled to the US (June 8)
  40. Man, 18 years old, Filipino, history of travel under investigation (June 8)
  41. Boy, 12 years old, Filipino, came from the US (June 8)
  42. Girl, 14 years old, Filipino, traveled to Canada (June 8)
  43. Girl, 14 years old, Filipino, traveled to the US (June 8)
  44. Man, 18 years old, Filipino, arrived from the US (June 8)
  45. Man, 27 years old, Japanese, came from Japan (June 8)
  46. Man, 63 years old, Japanese, came from Japan (June 8)
No further details are currently available about each of the eight (8) new victims, except that four (4) are males and four (4) are females with ages ranging from 16 to 44 years old. Six (6) of the cases are students of De La Salle University, while one is the first confirmed case in De La Salle-College of St. Benilde (CSB).

Summary of Confirmed A(H1N1) - Swine Flu Cases

* Total confirmed, as of June 9: 54
* Male cases: 50% (27)
* Female cases: 50% (27)
* Filipino: 80.4%
* Japanese: 10.9%
* Other: 8.7%
* Students of DLSU: 13
* Students of FEU- East Asia College: 1
* Students of DLSU-College of St. Benilde (CSB): 1

No further details are currently available about each of the eight (8) new victims, except that four (4) are males and four (4) are females with ages ranging from 16 to 44 years old. Six (6) of the cases are students of De La Salle University, while one is the first confirmed case in De La Salle-College of St. Benilde (CSB).

Source: News articles from Inquirer.net and GMANews.tv

June 9, 2009

DOH faced with double-edged sword of A(H1N1), dengue alarms

MANILA, Philippines – For the Department of Health (DOH), the globally feared Influenza A(H1N1) virus could not have come at a worse time than in the middle of the year – the same time cases of dengue, another “medical emergency," usually reach their peak.

As early as late April – around the same time the flu virus began spreading outside Mexico – Philippine health officials scrambled to address the emerging crisis.

Immediately, the government laid down preventive measures to ensure that the virus won’t reach Philippine shores: from installing thermal scanners to preparing stocks of anti-viral drugs, even going as far as banning pork importation.

With the discovery of the first confirmed A(H1N1) case in late May, the DOH had never been busier. It set out on a complex and meticulous process of tracing every single person who had contact with an infected patient – part of what it called “containment process."

Now that the rainy season has arrived, the Philippines faces the problem of containing not just the spread of the A(H1N1) virus but also the dengue virus.

“This is really a challenge for us because we are faced with a double burden," Dr. Eric Tayag, chief epidemiologist of the DOH, told GMANews.TV on Tuesday.

Tayag, however, assured that the department was “still on top of the situation."

He said the fact that the government’s anti-dengue campaign “has long been institutionalized" made things easier for the DOH. Given that dengue cases are always expected to rise during the rainy season, the DOH makes it a point to intensify information drives at this time of the year.

Health Secretary Francisco Duque III also made the same assurance, saying his department could juggle between handling cases of A(H1N1) and the long-time problems posed by dengue.

“Ang dengue, dapat talaga mas-bantayan ngayon because this is a medical emergency [We really have to keep watch of the dengue cases because this is a medical emergency]," the Health secretary said in a radio interview.

Duque said unlike the mutant flu virus, the effects of the dengue virus could not be eased or eliminated by any vaccine or drug.

Focus on dengue

In a separate interview with GMANews.TV, Dr. Antonietta Inumerable echoed the DOH officials' observation on the twin health problems and stressed that although both the flu and dengue viruses raise major health concerns, the DOH should focus more on the latter.

“If given the preference, the dengue cases should be given more priority because if left unattended, the result could really be severe," said Inumerable, who is head of the Quezon City health department.

Inumerable’s suggestion would seem sound if figures were solely to be used as basis.

From January to May, 275 dengue cases were recorded in Quezon City alone. Although the figure is a 58-percent drop from that of the same period last year, more people died this year.

Nine people succumbed to dengue around the same period last year, while 14 died since the start of 2009.

In contrast, the Quezon City government has not recorded any confirmed cases of A(H1N1) infection, despite being home to almost three million people. No one from the city had ever been included in the DOH’s contact tracing.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there are about 50 million cases of dengue infection worldwide every year, and the disease is epidemic in more than 100 countries.

In contrast, 73 countries have officially reported 25,288 cases of influenza A(H1N1) infection, including 139 deaths.

Overblown

But Tayag explained that as far as the national government is concerned, it is not taking any preference between attending to A(H1N1) and dengue cases, saying “both are equally important."

The chief epidemiologist said attention should not veer away from dengue because it has long been established that the virus when left unaddressed could claim many lives. But also, focus should be given to the A(H1N1) virus because – though having a low one-percent fatality rate – it remains shrouded in mystery.

“The virus is still unknown and unpredictable. Kung baga sa pagkain, tinitimpla pa natin siya [We are still testing the waters]," Tayag said.

Inumerable said she does not mind if the DOH appears to be “overreacting" on the flu scare.

“At least, our preparedness is being tested. Although the A(H1N1) scare seems overblown, we are already assured that we can handle the situation if ever things worsen," the chief city health official said.

She said that arrival of the flu scare in the country had not affected the city health department’s operations one single bit. “We are not suffering. We are actually integrating all the activities and the information campaign," she said.

The dengue and the A(H1N1) virus can both be prevented through proper hygiene, she said. Cleaning the surrounding would ward off mosquitoes that carry the dengue virus, while thorough washing of your hands would lessen the chances of contracting the flu virus.

Inumerable said that this year’s anti-dengue information drive through lectures were no longer limited to households and schools, but have also spanned city and village halls. - GMANews.TV

Philippines swine flu cases rise to 54

MANILA, Philippines – The Philippine health secretary says the number of swine flu cases in the country has risen to 54.

Francisco Duque III said Tuesday that eight new cases have been confirmed over the past 24 hours. They include six more students of Manila's De La Salle University, where seven others _ including two Japanese _ had been infected.

The two other new cases were a student from a nearby college and one foreigner. He said all the new and previous patients have exhibited only mild symptoms.

He said he has discussed with the World Health Organization representative in the Philippines a strategy that will focus on early detection and treatment, with only the high-risk patients hospitalized. The rest will be managed at home.

Source : http://ph.news.yahoo.com/ap/20090609/tap-as-philippines-swine-flu-fe2a5de.html

WALANG H1N1 SA SAN PABLO

Walang napapaulat na nagkaroon ng sintomas ng Influenza A na lalong kilala sa katawagang H1N1 Virus, sa Lunsod ng San Pablo, sapagka’t dapat malaman ng lahat na may ilan ng taon na ang City Health Office ay may organisadong Disease Surveilance Team na may maayos na pakikipag-ugnayan sa lahat ng mga pagamutan at samahan ng mga manggagamot sa Lunsod ng San Pablo, na ang mga ito ay nagpapadala ng ulat araw-araw tungkol sa mga di-pangkaraniwang pasyente na kanilang nagagamot o sa kanila ay nagkokunsulta, bilang pakikipagtulungan sa mga palatuntunang ipinatutupad ng Department of Health. Ito ang tuwirang ipinahayag ni City Health Officer Job D. Brion noong Miyerkoles ng hapon sa Media Forum na inorganisa ng City Information Office na dinaluhan ng mga kinatawan ng local tri-media.

Ipinapayo ni Dr. Brion sa lahat na huwag maniniwala sa mga text messages ukol sa di-umano ay may kinapitan na ng Influenza A virus sa lunsod, sapagka’t ito ay tsismes lamang,

Nabanggit ni Dr. Brion na dapat alalahanin na sang-ayon sa mga kilalang awtoridad sa public health management, higit na mapanganib ang Dengue Fever, kaysa kinatatakutang Influenza A (H1N1), sapagka’t ang mga nasusumpungang nagkaroon ng H1N1 Virus ay pinapapagpahinga lamang sa isang isolated room upang maiwasang magkaroon ng komplikasyon, at pagkalipas ng ilang araw ay kusa na itong nawawala o tinatalo na ng panlaban sa sakit na likas sa katawan ng tao.

Gaya ng sinasabi ni Health Secretary Francisco T. Duque III, ang Dengue Fever ay nagtataglay ng strong strain of virus, samantala ang Influenza A ay mild strain, kaya ang mga pamayanang may kahandaan laban sa Dengue Fever, ay may kahandaan na rin para maiwasan ang paglaganap ng Influenza A. Ang H1N1 ay pinalulubha ng takot, bagama’t ito ay maiiwasan sa pamamagitan ng tamang pag-iingat sa pakikihalobilo sa kanyang kapuwa.

Samantala, sa pahayag ni Dra. Mercydina Abdona Mendoza-Caponpon, team leader ng isa sa dalawang surveillance mobile team, hiniling niya sa mga kinatawan ng local mass media na paalalahanan ang mga mamamayan, na sakali’t sa kanilang tahanan ay may kinakikitaan ng sintomas ng Influenza A, ay huwag itong dadalahin sa pagamutan o magkokunsulta sa klinika ng isang manggagamot. Sa halip, sila ay tagubilinang manatili sa isang bukod na lugar, at iulat kaagad sa Disease Surveilance Team na naka-base sa City Health Office sa pamamagitan ng telepono o cellphone, at ang mobile team ang magsasadya sa kanila para sila ang magdetermina sa kung ano ang tinataglay na karamdaman ng pasyente, at kung ano ang mga hakbanging dapat isagawa.

Kung ang tinataglay na sakit ay karaniwang trangkaso o mga katulad nito, ay may dala silang sapat na gamot para rito, subalit kung sadyang H1N1 suspect, ay may sadyang ambulansyang gagamitin sa paglilipat ng pasyente at ang pagdadalahang pagamutan ay sa tagubilin ng Kalihim ng Kalusugan, na ang pinakamalapit ay ang Research for Tropical Medicine na nasa Alabang sa Muntinlupa City.

Sa magkaugnay na pagpapaliwanag nina Dra. Ma. Victoria Lopez-Guia at Lucy A. Celino, ay kanilang ipinaunawa na ang pinakamabuting paraan upang huwag mahawa ng Influenza A ay ang tamang pag-iingat at pagsasakit na magawang laging malinis ang kamay, laging tatakpan ang bibig kung umuubo at humahatsing, at pagdistansya kung nakikipag-usap sa may sakit. Dapat din ang tamang nutrisyon upang mapangalagaang malakas ang katawan at may resistansya laban sa karamdaman. (Ruben E. Taningco)

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